VALA2020 Plenary 1 Moriarty

Open as a Rule, Closed by Exception

VALA2020 PLENARY SESSION 1
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 9:30 – 10:40

Adam Moriarty
  • Auckland War Memorial Museum
  • Head of Collection Information and Access

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View the video of the presentation on the VALAView channel here:

Abstract

In 2015 Auckland Museum started a journey which felt in many ways untested, unmoderated and unsure, but like all great adventures into the unknown, it was exciting. We were armed with a simple vision – to be “Open as a Rule, Closed by Exception”.

What would it look like if we shifted the paradigm of institutional control? If we let the people of the world find their own stories, pathways and connections to our human and natural heritage collections? What would it mean to our metrics, our reputation and would anyone even notice?

The ensuing years have broadened our understanding of what it is to truly open our collections and threw into question, what were we trying to achieve? This session will reflect upon mission fulfilment and what it means to truly be OPEN.

Biography

Adam Moriarty is the Head of Collection Information and Access Team at Auckland War Memorial Museum in New Zealand. For the past five years he has worked to open the multidisciplinary collections online in a way that their stories can be freely accessed and shared. As his own journey has unfolded it has led him to question the true purpose and validity of his work. His most recent endeavours have started him to reconsider the direction museums might take to fulfil their mission.

 

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VALA2020 Session 1 Kearney

The Biodiversity Heritage Library and the evolution of uber-discoverability

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 1
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 11:25 – 11:55

Nicole Kearney
  • Manager Biodiversity Heritage Library Australia
  • Museums Victoria

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Abstract

2020 marks the 10-year anniversary of Australia’s partnership with the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL), a world-wide consortium of libraries digitising their biodiversity literature and making it openly accessible online. This paper celebrates this milestone by detailing the major accessibility and discoverability advances that have been achieved over the past decade, in the context of the Australian branch of the project, and will discuss the BHL’s ongoing evolution from being “just” the world’s largest online repository of biodiversity literature to becoming a fully searchable, persistently linkable source of big data, and thus an uber-discoverable online library.

 

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VALA2020 Session 1 Coates

Who needs an archival management system anyway? New approaches to the description and discovery of archival collections

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 1
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 12:00 – 12:30

Serena Coates
  • Coordinator, Digital Preservation
  • State Library of Queensland
Karen Stone
  • Lead, Metadata Services
  • State Library of Queensland

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Abstract

The State Library of Queensland recently embarked on a project to improve the process for describing its archival collections and the presentation of its online finding aids. Existing options for archival description were investigated, and it was decided to ‘go it alone’ with a bespoke system powered by Drupal. This paper outlines the processes followed during the project, detailing the challenges, solutions, lessons learned, and next steps.

 

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VALA2020 Session 2 Johnson

Conversation-led Library Services: delivering the Library to students in the age of digital Assistants

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 2
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 11:25 – 11:55

Danielle Johnson
  • Manager Digital Experience
  • Deakin University Library
Steve White
  • Digital Solutions Manager
  • Deakin University

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Abstract

DeakinGenie (“Genie”) is a smartphone-based digital assistant designed to provide personalised information and resources to guide undergraduate students through their study and life at Deakin via a voice/text controlled app. It uses artificial intelligence, natural language processing, integrations, development expertise and a program of content management to deliver point-of-need information to students via their mobile devices. It was launched to the Deakin University undergraduate student population in July 2018. This paper discusses the delivery of Deakin University Library services in Genie, including the pathways taken to ensure successful delivery of library services through the conversation-led approach.

 

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VALA2020 Session 2 Lemon

Introducing NED: Hercules to the Hydra of electronic legal deposit systems

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 2
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 12:00 – 12:30

Barbara Lemon
  • Executive Officer
  • National and State Libraries Australia
Elizabeth MacKenzie
  • NED Support Officer and NSLA eResources Consortium Manager
  • National Library of Australia

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Abstract

This paper provides an introduction to the National edeposit service (NED), launched in August 2019 as a world-first collaboration between the national, state and territory libraries of Australia. As a national online service for depositing, preserving and accessing Australian electronic publications, with benefits to publishers, libraries and the public alike, NED has transformed our approach to legal deposit in Australia.

 

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VALA2020 Session 3 Organ

Really real and virtually real: celebrating the works of Bert Flugelman

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 3
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 11:25 – 11:55

Michael Organ
  • Manager Repository Services
  • University of Wollongong
Grant White
  • Manager University Archives
  • University of Wollongong
Karen Illesca
  • Communication & Events Co-ordinator, Library
  • University of Wollongong
Nathan Riggir
  • Maker/MediaSpace Co-ordinator, Library
  • University of Wollongong
Phillippa Webb
  • Exhibitions Curator, Library
  • University of Wollongong

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Abstract

The University of Wollongong Library’s Wry ARTificer exhibition, featuring the work of Bert Flugelman, blended physical and virtual environments as a practical showcase of the organisation’s digital capabilities. A range of technologies were utilised, including the Microsoft Hololens augmented reality platform and 3D digitisation and modelling techniques. The exhibition stimulated collaboration between diverse communities of practice, including curators, archivists, learning technologists, software developers and librarians, to deliver an exciting and innovative interpretation of Flugelman’s life and work.

 

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VALA2020 Session 3 Greenhill

Kindness and UX in GLAMR online presence: same, same but different?

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 3
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 12:00 – 12:30

Kathryn Greenhill
  • Western Australia

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Abstract

Kindness, and its benefit to community and individuals, is a growing area of research and civic interest. This paper explores possible relationships between kindness and User Experience (UX), particularly within the online presence of publicly-funded Gallery, Library, Archives, Museums and Records (GLAMR) institutions. Library literature uses the term “kindness audit” to describe what are essentially UX studies within library buildings. This paper examines congruences and differences between UX and kindness, before extending the original idea of the kindness audit by suggesting four possible focus points, beyond UX, for a kindness audit of GLAMR online presence.

 

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VALA2020 Session 4 Chadwick

New values: supporting value-added data through the SCIS APIs

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 4
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 11:25 – 11:55

Ben Chadwick
  • Manager, Research and Information Services
  • Education Services Australia

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Abstract

Until 2017 the Schools Catalogue Information Service (SCIS) used the library industry standards MARC-21 and z39.50 to transmit data to subscribers’ local school library systems. SCIS launched a new platform in July 2017 and a set of APIs in March 2018, for the first time offering alternative transmission options compliant with ubiquitous web standards. These developments enabled SCIS to add value to its data, remove impediments to access, support on-the-fly provision of metadata for online resources, and pave the way for further innovations around RDA. This paper describes the new SCIS online services and the factors driving them.

 

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VALA2020 Session 4 Feighan

Putting the student in the library driver’s seat: implementing student co-design with existing library platforms to build engaging blending learning outcomes

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 4
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 12:00 – 12:30

David Feighan
  • Information and Library Services Manager
  • Mentone Girls’ Grammar School
Ellie Beni
  • Head of Year 7 and science teacher
  • Mentone Girls’ Grammar School

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Abstract

This paper focuses on a school library’s approach to using existing online platforms and services to scaffold learning by enabling students to directly curate content into the library’s portal. The goal of this pilot project is a student co-designed and blended learning program to teach students how to: use collections and the literature, cite and reference, and introduces the peer review process. This enables the library to move from a passive role, being the source of quality curated collections, to a more strategic partner and collaborator role that is directly involved in delivering value by improved student learning outcomes.

 

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VALA2020 Session 5 Seymour

Using technology to enable 24 hour access to print collections

This session is sponsored by Ex Libris

VALA2020 CONCURRENT SESSION 5
Tuesday 11 February 2020, 2:45 – 3:15

Karen Seymour
  • Manager Resource Delivery and Physical Collections
  • University of Queensland Library
Robert Bowen
  • Senior Systems Engineer
  • University of Queensland Library

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Read the paper and view the video of the presentation on the VALAView channel here:

Abstract

This paper outlines how the University of Queensland Library utilised RFID technology to enable 24×7 access to print collections. The methodology adopted for a trial is discussed, along with the technology used, stakeholder concerns and communication, outcomes and findings. The RFID technology used to safeguard and borrow the collection during staffed hours can also be utilised to make the collection accessible during non-staffed hours. UQ Library supported its strategic objectives, listened and responded to student feedback and was innovative and brave. Visits and borrowing during non-staffed hours demonstrated this initiative is convenient and useful for the Library’s clients.

 

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