VALA2018 Session 12 Fibrich

 

 
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Natalia Fibrich
Natalia Fibrich
 

Translating disruption into action: next steps for a 21st century library service

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION 12
Wednesday 14 February 2018, 15:20 – 15:50

Natalia Fibrich

Library Training Services Australia

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Abstract

Libraries need to update their structures, processes and behaviours, to ensure that they adapt and maintain agility in disruptive times. To facilitate adaptability, it is critical that library leaders understand the context (both internal and external) of their libraries, have effective leaders, a high-performing team, identify customer and non-customer needs, foster a positive organisational culture and facilitate an effective organisational strategy and design. This paper goes through each of these factors with the goal of helping leaders translate disruption into strategic and positive action, to ensure library and information services remain as relevant as they always have been to society.

 

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VALA2018 Plenary 4 Galvan

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Angela Galvan

The Revolution Will Not Be Standardized

VALA2018 PLENARY SESSION 4
Wednesday 14 February 2018, 16:20 – 17:30

Angela Galvan

Brown University Library, Rhode Island

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Abstract

Libraries are one of the last remaining public spaces–as a result, libraries face tremendous pressures from any number of sources. What can those of us working “behind the scenes” do to advocate for ourselves, colleagues, communities, and profession? Is it possible to reconcile surveillance hungry employers with our professional ethics? Is automation coming for our jobs?
Galvan will discuss the vital role technical services and library technologists play in shaping library cultures, how we resist, and the political implications of the systems, standards, and initiatives we support.

 

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VALA2018 Plenary 5 King

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David Lee King

The C Equation: Content + Connection + Community = Contented Customers

VALA2018 PLENARY SESSION 5
Thursday 15 February 2018, 9:00 – 10:15

David Lee King

Topeka & Shawnee County Public Library, Kansas

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Abstract

Big or small, urban or rural, every library has three critical aspects that will always affect customers: content, connection, and community.

Learn how to harness the power of traditional and emerging content needs, face-to-face connections—whether online or in-person—and community building. Putting these 3Cs to work will help your library achieve the ultimate goal: contented customers.

 

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VALA2018 Session 13 Keogh

 

 
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Electronic collections: shifting from development to management

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION 13
Thursday 15 February 2018, 10:50 – 11:20

Annette Keogh

The University of Auckland

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Abstract

This paper examines the changing academic library collections landscape, in which electronic resources play an increasingly dominant role. Prompted by both a change in strategic direction and a challenging budget, Libraries and Learning Services at the University of Auckland has shifted from building its electronic resource collections to managing them. In response, we have developed an electronic resources evaluation framework to ensure that our e-resource collection remains dynamic and most effectively meets our users’ needs.

 

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VALA2018 Session 13 Cleary

 

 
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Getting the balance right with ebooks

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION 13
Thursday 15 February 2018, 11:25 – 11:55

Colleen Cleary

Queensland University of Technology

John Lenehan

ITHAKA

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Abstract

This paper explores the challenges of provisioning a rapidly growing collection of ebooks using Demand Driven Acquisition (DDA) and Evidence-based Acquisition (EBA), the advantages and disadvantages of each model, the impact of usage and purchase trends, and whether these models provide enough evidence to establish future demand and content value. It also briefly examines the impact of various types of discovery on ebooks, in contrast with ejournals.

 

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VALA2018 Session 13 Johnston

 

 
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Nicole Johnston 120
Nicole Johnston
 

Print versus digital preferences of university students in Australia

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION 13
Thursday 15 February 2018, 12:00 – 12:30

Nicole Johnston and Alicia Salaz

Edith Cowan University

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Abstract

This paper presents findings of a survey that investigated the reading preferences of university students at Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Perth, Australia. This survey is being undertaken as part of the Academic Reading Format International Study (ARFIS), which is investigating print versus digital reading preferences in 31 countries. A total of 582 students completed the survey. Results from the survey indicate a strong preference for reading in print because of issues such as eyestrain, tactile features, better focus, and ability to highlight and take notes. Issues such as cost, usability and accessibility also impacted on students’ reading decisions.

 

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VALA2018 Session 14 Styles

 

 
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Geraldine Styles
Geraldine Styles
 

Innovation and disruption in a legal library: bringing a library technician’s perspective to precedent development

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION 14
Thursday 15 February 2018, 10:50 – 11:20

Geraldine Styles

Meyer Vandenberg

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Abstract

Automated document generation software is an increasingly important component of law firm knowledge management. This paper discusses the ongoing precedents development project at Meyer Vandenberg and how the firm has embraced a hybrid practitioner model, bringing formerly IT domain functions under the umbrella of knowledge and information services. This paper also examines on-the-job development of technical (programming) skills and the use of collaborative, customer-focused workflow models to improve stakeholder engagement, and facilitate knowledge capture and sharing.

 

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VALA2018 Session 14 Harper

 

 
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Glenn Harper
Glenn Harper
 

We need to talk about fake news

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION 14
Thursday 15 February 2018, 11:25 – 11:55

Glenn Harper

Monash Public Library Service

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Abstract

Everyone is susceptible to confirmation bias and experiences like the Dunning Kruger effect, including library staff. It has been argued that libraries, staffed by trusted information professionals, should be part of the solution to fake news (Alvarez 2017 and Chen, Conroy and Rubin 2015). This paper reviews the current phenomenon of fake news by defining some key terms and discusses insights into online behaviours that enable fake news to flourish. Finally, the paper looks at survey results and argues that steps should be taken to improve the digital information literacy of library staff.

 

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VALA2018 Session 14 Kelly

 

 
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Andrew Kelly 120
Andrew Kelly
 

Giving away free internet is harder than it sounds: how to help students and not sound like a scam

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION 14
Thursday 15 February 2018, 12:00 – 12:30

Andrew Kelly

City of Armadale

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Abstract

One of the core pillars of libraries is providing free access to information. In today’s digital society, much of that information is accessible exclusively via the Internet. Without cheap and reliable access to the Internet, many people find it hard to access services, government support, education, banking, and employment. The City of Armadale libraries ran a pilot project with Telstra to provide free Internet access to local, disadvantaged year-eleven and year-twelve students for the school year.

 

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VALA2018 Session 15 Maloney

 

 
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Kayla Maloney
Kayla Maloney
 

Visualise this: developing specialist digital literacies in the postgraduate curriculum

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION 15
Thursday 15 February 2018, 10:50 – 11:20

Kayla Maloney and Kate Stanton

The University of Sydney

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Abstract

The University of Sydney Library has taken on new roles supporting the development of digital literacies, including a collaboration with the School of Public Health that directly addresses postgraduates’ digital literacy skills, and supports the University’s strategic focus on developing digital literacy as a core graduate quality. Scalability and sustainability were key considerations, and many of the course materials were designed to be repurposed as part of other training materials. Librarians’ expertise in delivering information literacy education, coupled with specialist Library staff knowledge in rapidly evolving information domains, provided the right elements to deliver this collaborative education project. Library and information professionals have a critical role to play in identifying and developing the qualities that students need to succeed in their studies and future careers.

 

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