VALA2018 Session 4 Cowell

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Personalisation or What we have learned from Netflix

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION  4
Tuesday 13 February 2018, 15:20 – 15:50

Jane Cowell

State Library of Queensland

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Description

How does digital first ABC Podcast TRACE and the future Retail 4.0 experience inform the library experience? Join Jeremy Story Carter, Walkley award-winning reporter and digital content producer with ABC RN, Renowned Futurist Marcus Barber and Library Passionata Jane Cowell as they discuss the current and future content experiences from a consumer point of view & discuss these as drivers for library industry change.

 

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VALA2018 Session 5 McCarthy

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Can archives fly? Delivering Australian archives to researchers

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION  5
Tuesday 13 February 2018, 14:45 – 15:15

Gavan McCarthy and Peter Tonoli

University of Melbourne

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Abstract

This paper outlines the rationale and initial development of a service that will allow digital materials held by archives to be delivered, via request through an online form, to researchers anywhere in the world. Rather than attempting to provide access to privacy and rights-compromised materials in an online environment, the delivery of derivative copies of these types of unpublishable materials directly to the researcher, under clearly-articulated conditions, helps deal with a range of onerous technical and administrative issues. The process supports, rather than complicates, researcher information transfer needs while meeting the custodial obligations of the information provider.

 

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VALA2018 Session 5 Mason

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360-degree model for archival data sharing: humanities and GLAM interoperability

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION  5
Tuesday 13 February 2018, 15:20 – 15:50

Ingrid Mason

AARNet

Sarah Nisbet

eResearch South Australia

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Abstract

In the Cultures and Communities project, common cross-community aims to make archival information accessible and reusable for academic research, and to share data, have been realised. The API developed through the project supports systematic access to archival data and derived data publishing, and has demonstrated the value of a 360-degree model for data sharing and interoperability. The 360-degree model enables humanities and GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums) cross-community collaboration and can be broadly applied to enabling systematic access to data in cultural collections for all Australian research.

 

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VALA2018 Session 6 Epps

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Colin Bates
Colin Bates

Tales from the field: enhancing the discoverability of field notes and field specimens

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION  6
Tuesday 13 February 2018, 14:45 – 15:15

Janine Epps, Colin Bates, Bernadette Houghton, Kristen Thornton

Deakin University Library

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Abstract

Field specimens and field notes provide a rich source of data for researchers. In 2016, Deakin University Library implemented a project to make accessible an historic field specimen album by William Harvey and a set of field diaries by noted scientist, Edmund Gill. Such unique and unusual items created challenges for the digitisation process and also led us to explore a range of methods to enhance their discovery and promotion. This paper outlines the digitisation project, the use of metadata, digital exhibitions and social media to expose the digitised items and the collaboration required to successfully complete the project.

 

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VALA2018 Session 6 Warren

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Creating a digital legacy: QANZAC100: Memories for a New Generation

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION  6
Tuesday 13 February 2018, 15:20 – 15:50

Margaret Warren and Robyn Hamilton

State Library of Queensland

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Abstract

Through collection acquisition, digitisation, engagement and data sharing activities, State Library of Queensland’s QANZAC100: Memories for a New Generation project has created a unique digital legacy of Queensland participation in the First World War. With an aim to increase understanding of Queenslanders’ experiences during and after the First World War, the project has also built the capacity of community stakeholders to explore and share local and family stories, enabled researchers to access content, explored how the war is remembered, and encouraged a re-examination of the past. In order to sustain a digital legacy, outcomes of the project have been considered as data, with intent to achieve open, structured, interoperable, and re-usable data.

 

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VALA2018 Plenary 2 Buxton

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Maggie Buxton

The Re-storying of Place – Disruptive technologies and the hyperlocal library

VALA2018 PLENARY SESSION 2
Tuesday 13 February 2018, 16:20 – 17:30

Maggie Buxton

Producer, educator, consultant and place innovator

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Abstract

Imagine wandering the alleyways of your town as audio stories emerge straight out from the spaces around you. Or standing on a historical site watching layers of history unfold in front of your eyes. Thanks to emerging mobile technologies stories, histories, knowledge and learning can now be directly linked to and accessed within to their physical context – as they always have been for many first nation and indigenous peoples. In this way the technologies that facilitate these experiences have the potential to fundamentally disrupt the notion of traditional libraries as much as the development of the internet.

Maggie Buxton’s presentation discusses her PhD research and community based practice using these emerging tools to re-story places and re-place stories. She will be sharing experiences and projects working across a wide range of groups including Maori, Pacifica peoples, school children and the elderly. This spiritual, social, political, developmental practice is fundamentally aimed at expanding awareness, shifting perception and generating individual and collective learning.
For further information go to http://www.awhiworld.com/ & http://maggiebuxton.com/

 

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VALA2018 Plenary 3 Miller

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Matt Miller

Linked Data Liminality

VALA2018 PLENARY SESSION 1
Wednesday 14 February 2018, 9:00 – 10:15

Matt Miller

Pratt Institute’s School of Information, New York

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Abstract

Linked Data has been on the metadata horizon for libraries and other cultural heritage institutions for some time. While great progress has been made we are still in the early days of adopting and applying these new methodologies. Though we often think of Linked Data as a universal big data endeavor, being worked on by large entities, some of its most compelling uses are small scale bottom-up projects. For example, using Linked Data to uncover underrepresented individuals and their histories. Or utilizing it as a pedagogical platform to build new skills for current and emerging information professionals. And even thinking of Linked Data as a tool for increasing civic engagement.

We’ll explore projects like these and think broadly how Linked Data can be used in exciting ways. We will also reflect on what we can rethink during this period of transition. Data models, workflows, how we collaborate and more can be looked at with a critical eye. While Linked Data presents significant challenges it also creates important new opportunities for change and growth.

 

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VALA2018 Session 7 Cook

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David Cook
David Cook

Linked Data in Koha

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION  7
Wednesday 14 February 2018, 10:50 – 11:20

David Cook

Prosentient Systems

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Abstract

Despite the concept of Linked Data being over ten years old, it has yet to make a practical impact in the library world. Libraries prize standards and best practices, but there is no clear leader in the field and many Linked Data implementations appear experimental or isolated. Nonetheless, stakeholders in Sweden, Norway, the United States of America, and Australia are working to integrate Linked Data into the open-source library management system Koha. There are many challenges, but developers are collaborating globally to overcome them.

 

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VALA2018 Session 7 Lawrence

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Amanda Lawrence
Amanda Lawrence

APO linked open data collections for public policy

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION  7
Wednesday 14 February 2018, 11:25 – 11:55

Amanda Lawrence

APO Analysis and Policy Observatory

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Abstract

Linked data is an approach to digital information infrastructure that aims to enhance the utility of data on the web, by making it more consistent, structured and connected, and therefore discoverable and able to be analysed within and across information systems. Key elements are the need for information rich structured data, standardised classification systems and stable online locations for linking across information systems. The implementation of linked data approaches is allowing APO to go beyond standard bibliographic information on publications and data to consider every piece of structured and unstructured information as a potential source of data that can be analysed and visualised to provide new knowledge on policy issues and the policy process.

 

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VALA2018 Session 8 Greenhill

 

 
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Kathryn Greenhill
Kathryn Greenhill
 

Iterative and incremental evaluation works for software development, but can it be good for student learning initiatives in Australian academic libraries?

VALA2018 CONCURRENT SESSION  8
Wednesday 14 February 2018, 10:50 – 11:20

Kathryn Greenhill and Karen Miller

Curtin University

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Abstract

Iterative and incremental development in software engineering involves small, ongoing “evaluate, review, act” cycles, allowing rapid development of rough prototypes of a software product that can be altered and re-tested, long before the product is considered “finished” and made available to the final stakeholders. This paper investigates whether Australian academic libraries are currently applying iterative and incremental evaluation to the development of student learning initiatives run by the library. It examines whether there are possible places in the development-cycle of these initiatives where iterative evaluation could happen, and whether it actually does happen.

 

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